Compare Chef’s Knives

Wusthof

High-Carbon Stainless Steel

handlebladedurabilitysharpness
 ploy blend (revited)High Carbon full tangLowHigh

Wusthof

This is a German made hig-carbon chef’s knife. The high-carbon indicates that carbon was added to the stainless steel in the manufacturing process. This creates a stronger blade, that will hold an edge longer and will be easier to sharpen, but can rust over time and requires additional maintenance.

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Miyabi Fusion

Stainless Steel

handlebladedurabilitysharpness
 woodlaminated full tangMediumHigh

Miyabi Fusion

This is a traditional Japanese chef’s knife. The laminated steel blends layers of steel that have different properties so that the knife can both hold an edge like the high-carbon blades and is durable like the stainless steel blades. This knife happens to not be dishwasher safe, but there are examples of laminated blades that are dishwasher safe. Most professional chef’s prefer the non-dishwasher safe knives as a dishwasher can dull a blade.

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Victorinox Swiss Army

High-Carbon Stainless Steel

handlebladedurabilitysharpness
 plasticstainless steel half tangHighLow

Wusthof

This is a standard, entry level chef’s knife, found in a lot of restaurants. Although, it is not as sharp as others, it is easy to make, can last a long time without much maintenance, and is dishwasher safe. There are varrying levels of stainless steal blades, some are full tang (which as sturdier) and some have metal handles (which are not as comfortable to use), but the defining feature is durability and in-expensive.

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